If you didn’t know by now, one of the reasons I’m here is to put coffee dogma to the test.

Some examples:

I think it’s important to not just accept things as is because of what everyone says and does, which is why I am constantly testing these coffee theories to find out what works best for me.

Now, I know people won’t always agree with my taste buds, so the other purpose of these coffee experiments is to show you what I do so you can test these coffee theories for yourself.

Back to the point

In this most recent test, I decided to see if pre-wetting filters really makes a better cup of coffee or not. More specifically, does a filter that has been soaked with hot water before the brew taste less “papery” than that of a cup without a pre-soaked filter?

Experimental parameters

  • 15 grams of coffee (medium-fine grind)
  • 270 grams of water at 202˚F  (18:1 ratio)
  • Bonavita Immersion dripper
  • Melitta #4 brown paper filters

Nobody’s perfect

I brewed each cup of coffee separately, not simultaneously. Obviously, this doesn’t make the experiment too sound in terms of eliminating confounding variables (such as drinking temperature), but I don’t own two of the same coffee drippers…so it’s the best I could do with what I have.

Try it yourself…

Now, it would be hypocritical of me if I said that my results are exactly what your results should be.

No way, Jose!

Make sure you test pre-wetting paper filters yourself to see if it makes any difference in your final cup of coffee or not. A good reason to test this theory to begin with would be if you are tasting traces of paper flavor in your cups of coffee.

But if you are tasting paper no matter whether you are pre-wetting your filters or not, you might want to ditch this practice all together.

The point is: test it if you think it could help you make better coffee for yourself.

Tools used in this coffee experiment